Loss of Airport Access Credentials -Secured Identification Display Area (SIDA) badge

In 2015, TSA performed almost 13 million employee screenings for individuals requesting unescorted access to secured areas in airports. These credentials, called Secured Identification Display Area (SIDA) badges are necessary for everyone from pilots to janitorial workers that need regular access to areas in the airport that are behind the security checkpoint. While terrorism concerns provide the main justification for this coveted credential, the criminal history disqualifications are much more likely to affect your average applicant or employee.

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Arizona Standard Conditions of Probation Now Include Warrantless Cell Phone Searches

Recently, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled that probationer’s cell phones are included in the definition “property” that is subject to warrantless searches and seizures, as long as the search is “reasonable under the totality of circumstances.”

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SCOTUS Resolves Circuit Split and Rejects 9th Circuit’s More Lenient Cancellation of Removal Standard

Immigration law is full of confusing jargon and seemingly contradictory statutes. One confusing concept is that of “inadmissibility.” On its face, inadmissibility would seem to mean that one who is ineligible to be “admitted” to the U.S. is “inadmissible,” but this term also applies to aliens within the U.S. who have committed one of a number of offenses. In other words, you do not have to be seeking admission or denied admission, once you have committed a qualifying offense, you are “inadmissible”.

Read: SCOTUS Resolves Circuit Split and Rejects 9th Circuit’s More Lenient Cancellation of Removal Standard

New Technologies and Apps for Alcohol Detection and DUI Prevention Could Reduce DUI and Present New Legal Questions

There are exhaustive amounts of DUI case law that address the level of reasonable suspicion needed for a DUI stop, when and how breathalyzers and blood tests can be used as scientific evidence of impairment, and how field sobriety tests must be conducted to be used as evidence of probable cause for arrest. But, new technologies for alcohol detection that are currently available or will soon be available are likely to result in new case law that addresses the accuracy and use of these technologies to make legal determinations of impairment or impose other collateral consequences on impaired drivers.

Read: New Technologies and Apps for Alcohol Detection and DUI Prevention Could Reduce DUI and Present New Legal Questions

Who Can Find Out About My Arizona DUI Arrest or Conviction?

If you are convicted of DUI in Arizona, this information will be shared with various governmental entities and private parties can also access the information through certain channels. Even before you are convicted, there could be certain parties that receive notice of your arrest. This means that, in addition to jail time and restrictions on your ability to drive, even the accusation of a DUI can have long-lasting impacts on your ability to work in your profession, your professional reputation, your immigration status, and even your ability to travel to certain other countries.

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What is Prosecutorial Stacking of Charges?

In Arizona, repeat felony offenders face harsher sentencing guidelines than first-time offenders. When prosecutors “stack” charges, defendants can be sentenced as repeat offenders even if the defendant has no prior convictions. Under current guidelines, as long as a prosecutor can prove that crimes were committed on separate occasions, the crimes can be prosecuted in the same trial but for the second and subsequent offenses, the defendant is sentenced as a repeat offender.

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Covid Assault: Is it a Real Thing?

Yes! Jurisdictions all over the country are faced with cases of individuals using or threatening to use Covid-19 as a “weapon” to harm others. You may have seen the now viral video of a woman who was seen coughing on produce in a grocery store, but that is only the tip of the iceberg and different jurisdictions are handling these situations in different ways.

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No reforms for Arizona asset forfeiture this year

Proposed reforms to Arizona’s asset forfeiture rules failed this year, despite strong support. Analysis of
state data shows that forfeitures fall heaviest on people who cannot afford an attorney, most cases
involves small amounts of money, and crime victims receive little compensation.

Read: No reforms for Arizona asset forfeiture this year

BIA Must Disclose Evidence Against Some Applicants Accused of Marriage Fraud

Even the most experienced immigration lawyers can sometimes be completely baffled as to why USCIS denies a particular petition, especially when USCIS claims the applicant committed some type of fraud. In these cases, it can be very difficult to obtain the exact information which led to the finding, which also makes it difficult to develop a strategy for appealing the decision.

Read: BIA Must Disclose Evidence Against Some Applicants Accused of Marriage Fraud

No COVID-19 business loans for owners with recent felony convictions

The Paycheck Protection Program is supposed to protect small businesses that otherwise might not weather the COVID-19 economic storm by providing low-interest forgivable loans primarily intended to preserve employment. The very smallest businesses – self-employed people and independent contractors – are also eligible. Unless, that is, the person has a felony conviction, even though it is precisely these people who have the greatest difficulty finding employment after serving their sentence.

Read: No COVID-19 business loans for owners with recent felony convictions